Resources > Articles

Who Should Own Product Positioning?

Post Author
  • Steve Johnson was a founding instructor at Pragmatic Institute, a role he held for more than 15 years before he left to start Under10 Playbook. In his return to Pragmatic Institute, Steve supports the complete learning path for product teams, ensuring they are fully armed for success.  Over the course of his career, Steve has helped thousands of companies and tens of thousands of product professionals implement product management processes. He has worked in the high-tech arena since 1981, rising through the ranks from product manager to chief marketing officer. Steve has experience in technical, sales and marketing management positions at companies that specialize in both hardware and software. In addition, he is an author, speaker and advisor on product strategy and product management.

Who Should Own Product Positioning?

Who Should Own Product Positioning?

 

Who should own product positioning? Product or marketing? Positioning is a key element of product management. Positioning documents will define your product category, the problems it solves, and the personas it serves.

Whenever I work with a new team, I always begin with roles and responsibilities. Who owns what?

Lately, I’ve been thinking and talking about a new binary model for role definition: Product leaders (that is, product managers and product marketing managers) own problems; development and marketing teams own solutions.

So how does this model impact product positioning? A product’s position is what it does and for whom. It defines a unique place in the buyer’s mind. It defines the product in the context of the problem. A positioning document contains the who and what. And why this product is better than alternatives.

Marketing then leverages this foundational document to create solutions: campaigns, sales tools, web pages, and so on. It turns positioning into messaging. Positioning is what we’ll say; the messaging is how we’ll say it. In general, marketing owns messaging while the product leader owns positioning.

Simply put, if you don’t know the positioning, you’re not ready to begin your promotion. If you understand the personas and their problems, you should own positioning.

Author

  • Steve Johnson was a founding instructor at Pragmatic Institute, a role he held for more than 15 years before he left to start Under10 Playbook. In his return to Pragmatic Institute, Steve supports the complete learning path for product teams, ensuring they are fully armed for success.  Over the course of his career, Steve has helped thousands of companies and tens of thousands of product professionals implement product management processes. He has worked in the high-tech arena since 1981, rising through the ranks from product manager to chief marketing officer. Steve has experience in technical, sales and marketing management positions at companies that specialize in both hardware and software. In addition, he is an author, speaker and advisor on product strategy and product management.

Author:

Other Resources in this Series

Most Recent

plan, strategy
Article

How to Create a Strategic Product Plan

Most technology companies have a product management department serving as the voice of the customer and helping to understand market needs better but is product management really being used strategically?
Optimizing product management budgets
Article

How to do More With the Same (or fewer) Resources in 2023 with Segmentation and Targeting Updates

Six steps to a data-driven understanding of your best-fit buyer. Improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your marketing programs by shifting your focus (and budgets) to best-fit personas and ICPs. 
Person working on project management software on a tablet
Article

10 Tools for Product Managers 

The right product tools can make it easier to manage your team, but there are hundreds out there—so how do you choose which one is right for you?
Purchasing on a mobile device with a credit card
Article

8 Distribution Strategy Examples For Product Teams 

A distribution strategy is a blueprint for how your company delivers its products to customers. Here are 8 methods and helpful examples. 
Magnifying glass emphasizing the word data
Article

Going Beyond Win/Loss Data

The true value of a win/loss program comes from unfolding the narrative behind that data. 

OTHER ArticleS

plan, strategy
Article

How to Create a Strategic Product Plan

Most technology companies have a product management department serving as the voice of the customer and helping to understand market needs better but is product management really being used strategically?
Optimizing product management budgets
Article

How to do More With the Same (or fewer) Resources in 2023 with Segmentation and Targeting Updates

Six steps to a data-driven understanding of your best-fit buyer. Improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your marketing programs by shifting your focus (and budgets) to best-fit personas and ICPs. 

Sign up to stay up to date on the latest industry best practices.

Sign up to received invites to upcoming webinars, updates on our recent podcast episodes and the latest on industry best practices.

Training on Your Schedule

Fill out the form today and our sales team will help you schedule your private Pragmatic training today.

Subscribe

Subscribe

Training on Your Schedule

Fill out the form today and our sales team will help you schedule your private Pragmatic training today.