Different types of goodness

In the world of requirements, (virtually) anything is possible. So given more than can be done, how does one choose?

Bob looks at requirements: different types of goodness:"As I consider a raft of requirements from both inside and outside the organization, I'm struck by the motivations behind them. Some features are suggested because 'they'll make money'. Others because 'they complete the product'. Still others 'are really, really important to customer x'. Competitors dictate some, preferences of developers others, and executives still others. The list of sources is as long as my arm, which truth be told, is rather on the longish side."

An old Danish proverb states: He who builds to every man's advice will have a crooked house. As Bob points out, choice involves focus–focus on a segment, focus on a persona, focus on a set of problems for a persona in a segment.

The more we listen to everyone, the less we actually seem to accomplish for anyone. The question for your next MRD is what type of customer do we want to delight?–and who are we not going to focus on, at least not this time?

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  • Steve Johnson was a founding instructor at Pragmatic Institute, a role he held for more than 15 years before he left to start Under10 Playbook. In his return to Pragmatic Institute, Steve supports the complete learning path for product teams, ensuring they are fully armed for success.  Over the course of his career, Steve has helped thousands of companies and tens of thousands of product professionals implement product management processes. He has worked in the high-tech arena since 1981, rising through the ranks from product manager to chief marketing officer. Steve has experience in technical, sales and marketing management positions at companies that specialize in both hardware and software. In addition, he is an author, speaker and advisor on product strategy and product management.

Steve Johnson

Steve Johnson

Steve Johnson was a founding instructor at Pragmatic Institute, a role he held for more than 15 years before he left to start Under10 Playbook. In his return to Pragmatic Institute, Steve supports the complete learning path for product teams, ensuring they are fully armed for success.  Over the course of his career, Steve has helped thousands of companies and tens of thousands of product professionals implement product management processes. He has worked in the high-tech arena since 1981, rising through the ranks from product manager to chief marketing officer. Steve has experience in technical, sales and marketing management positions at companies that specialize in both hardware and software. In addition, he is an author, speaker and advisor on product strategy and product management.

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